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  1. #1
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    Lightbulb La Conversation en Francais

    Salut toute le monde - avec votre permission, je voudrais commencer une discussion ici en Anglais. Merci at tout!



    ... ahem. Sorry, would've started it in French if mine were good enough. I wanted to share this with you because several people are about to travel to Paris and I also thought that this would be an ideal oppurtunity to gain the perspective of those Frenchwomen and Parisians here. If this doesn't agree with you, we can always move this into the Aznlover Europe section.



    [French] Conversation as a Dance of Drama

    Even if you find a French person who speaks English to you, you'll want to know some of the rules of French conversation. Seek topics that will interest your listener and keep your commentary lively, animated, and brief. Don't turn a question into a lecture, holding the floor. It is rude to the other conversants, and it threatens to bore, the worst offence you can make.


    Let the focus of the conversation move around to different topics. Each person should contribute little snatches of appropriate comment, tossing the conversation back and forth, like a ball. If you are asked where you come from, expect to hear something of the other person's experiences in that place or that country. You can reply with a question on an unrelated topic of interest, though some mental transition is usually involved. Inother words, THINK. And give your conversation partner the benefit of that effort!


    Raymonde Carrol likens French converstation to a spider's web. A good one is made up of many different threads and angles, creating a beautiful and complex shape at its end. It is unncessary, in fact, undesirable, to seek a common pointof veiw with your interlocutors. To distinguish is an intellectual aim. To remark upon similarities is tnot so interesing. This is less difficult for the English, accustomed to the art of debate than it is for Americans who normally offer agreement just to be polite.

    Interruptions are also perfectly acceptable in French conversation. One French conversant need only give the slightest pause for the other to cut in with his response. If you dont give a pause, your French interlocutor will probaby break in. That's not being rude, that's being participatory. Be witty, be funny. The rapidity of the interruptions and even the volume of the exchange may increase as the conversants get more excited... like a dance that get faster and faster.


    A lively conversation is a successful interaction. As intensity builds, punctuations of loud laughter and even explosion of anger may occur. Don't be alarmed. Drama is part of the debate, and the quest is only for a better understanding of the topics covered and a deeper rspect for the intelligence of the indivisual players involved. A frenzy of disagreement may suddenly collapse into a new subject, the pace changed, the players move on.


    What do you think about these?



    Some more - this time pertinent to Asians in a sense:

    Speak Softly


    Whatever you talk about, remember to moderate your voice! Talking at normal volume in a shop or restaurant with friends, the patron or anybody else, will disturb others and will be considered very rude. In a small French restaurtnt, where the tables are squezed tightly together, anything approaching nomral volume is too loud. The French love to talk, but they are extremely courtous of other people's desire to do so in public places. Speak as though no one but your interlocutor should be aware you are speaking.


    We have all been embarrassed by our fellow [U.S.] countrymen speaking too loudly, especailly if they are in a large group. We are all guilty of this. Having one or more of your own countrymen along with you anywhere puts oyu into a little cultural "Bubble" of your own. Sudeenly the rules of your own society apply, not thsoe of the culture around you.


    Groups of tourists are consipcuous and usually unattractiev everwhere because of the culture insulation their numbers provide. Try to remember that the French speak very softly in public palces, much lower than they would at home, as a consideration to others. Moderate your voice. That is the golden rule of converatsion in France.

    More to come....

    Last edited by GoldenHorde; 12-23-2005 at 12:07 PM.

  2. #2
    kimchi
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldenHorde
    Salut toute le monde - avec votre permission, je voudrais commencer une discussion ici en Anglais. Merci at tout!



    ... ahem. Sorry, would've started it in French if mine were good enough. I wanted to share this with you because several people are about to travel to Paris and I also thought that this would be an ideal oppurtunity to gain the perspective of those Frenchwomen and Parisians here. If this doesn't agree with you, we can always move this into the Aznlover Europe section.









    What do you think about these?



    Some more - this time pertinent to Asians in a sense:




    More to come....

    I never thought that french people jumped from one subject to the next, but coming to think about it, maybe the article is right... Those family holidays were full of fueled and full of passionate debates... It was fun!!! And we did talk about different subjects but they were always related and actually always came back to the original point of the debate.
    We often say in france that if u talk about religion or politics the discussion can go soar. We still do it, but I wouldn't recommend it to a novice... hehehe

  3. #3
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    I would never have thought that our conversations in France can as many contain details and rules...

    it is a whole art of speaking French

    sorry...

    seriously, I think that all that is not essential to come to speak to us in France. We are very tolerant, especially the younger generation. Even me I am astonished to see similar councils.

  4. #4
    kimchi
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    U know what I think the speaking softly part even when ur having a passionate debate is quite true actually. I would explain it bc tables are often placed close to each other in cafés and restaurants, and also the by viceral need of french people to preserve intimacy and privacy at all costs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by narusan75
    seriously, I think that all that is not essential to come to speak to us in France. We are very tolerant, especially the younger generation. Even me I am astonished to see similar councils.



    I believe you. Well, I guess this can be seen as going that extra mile. Understanding the rules of communication in France can get your foot inside doors which may normally be totally inaccessible to an ignorant foreigner. Just a thought.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kimchi
    We often say in france that if u talk about religion or politics the discussion can go soar.
    Just for clarification - did you meant discussion can "go sour" (bad) or "soar" (good)?

  7. #7
    kimchi
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dupre
    Just for clarification - did you meant discussion can "go sour" (bad) or "soar" (good)?
    sour, sorry for the spelling mistake!
    (and btw it's did u mean not did u meant... lool; ok i'm just kidding here!)
    Last edited by kimchi; 01-30-2006 at 06:59 AM.


 

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